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CORP2551 Management and Entrepreneurship

CORP2551 Management and Entrepreneurship

 

 

 

 

Department: Management and Entrepreneurship

Module code: CORP2551

 

Academic Year: 2021-2022

Credit value:       15 credits

 

Module coordinator: Prof. Adel Hatamimarbini

Email: adel.hatamimarbini@dmu.ac.uk

Room:                                          HU 4.103

Advice and Feedback hours:     Wed 11.00am-1.00pm

 

Module Overview

 

  Assessment 1 Assessment 2
Type Individual report 1 Individual report 2
Length 1250 words 1250 words
Weighting 50% 50%
Deadline 11: 59am Monday

17th January 2022

11: 59am Tuesday

3rd May 2022

Return date Week 16 Week 31

 

Note: All coursework must be submitted electronically via Turnitin by the deadlines unless there are mitigating circumstances. Information on penalties and late submissions can be found at: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/deferral-of-assessments.aspx

 

The Faculty is committed to a 20 day turnaround time for the marking and return of coursework. The turnaround time does not include weekends, bank holidays or university closure days.

 

 

 

 

WELCOME TO THE MODULE

 

Let me first of all welcome you to this 15-credit module on Global Operations and Supply Chain Management.

 

Nowadays, Global Operations and Supply Chain Management (GOSCM) play an important role in improving productivity and competitive positioning of a wide variety of businesses around the globe. In the Covid-19 global, GOSCM is even more important. In spite of many supply-chain disruptions caused by disasters in the last decade such as the eruption of a volcano in Iceland, the Japanese earthquake and tsunami and Thailand floods, most companies still found themselves unprepared and fragile during the Covid-19 crisis. Therefore, the appreciation of operations and supply chain processes is of the essence to create a competitive advantage through operations in the marketplace. The data-driven and analytical perspectives are vital to create an effective supply chain in top performing firms. Above all, successful managers often take advantage of the analytics approach to apprehend and select the proper strategies through the decision-making process.

 

This module provides you with high-level managerial and analytical topics, leading to an understanding of what these topics are, why they are crucial to organisations, and how organisations are successfully implementing and integrating them. We aim to introduce the most important concepts and techniques facing operation and supply chain managers as well as to analyse real-world applications in both the manufacturing and service organisations.

 

I, along with the module team wish you success in this module. If you have any problems and questions with regard to this module, do not hesitate to contact us.

 

Adel

Professor Adel Hatamimarbini

 

Leicester De Montfort Law School

 

Our Mission Our Vision Our Values
•       To enable to the legal profession for all

•       To embed professionalism, scholarship and a commitment to transforming justice into all of our provision

•       To develop the learner as an influencer of positive change in the current and future justice system

 

To transform justice through knowledge

 

LEADERSHIP: Confidence and courage to shape a better future

INTEGRITY: Taking personal pride in our work

CREATIVITY: Thinking beyond the usual and embracing ideas

GLOBAL MINDEDNESS: Finding opportunities in our diversity

COMMUNITY: Realising the purpose and power of law

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

WELCOME TO THE MODULE.. 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS.. 2

  1. MODULE OUTLINE. 4

1.1.       The Teaching Team.. 4

1.2.       Module Aims and Objectives. 5

1.3.       How It’s Going to Be Taught 5

1.4.       How This Module Enhances Your Employability. 6

1.5.       Your Responsibility. 7

  1. LECTURE/SEMINAR SCHEDULE. 9

Case study-Tesla’s Quality Challenge. 9

  1. MODULE RESOURCE LIST. 11
  2. MODULE SUPPORT. 12

4.1.  BLACKBOARD AND MODULE COMMUNICATIONS. 12

4.2.  ADVICE AND FEEDBACK HOURS. 12

4.3.  LIBRARY SUPPORT. 13

4.4.  STUDY SKILLS. 13

  1. ASSESSMENT BRIEFS. 14

5.1.  General Guidance on Assessment 1. 14

5.2.  General Guidance on Assessment 2. 16

5.3.  MARKING.. 19

  1. OUR ENGAGEMENT WITH YOU.. 19
  2. ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS. 19

7.1.       Reassessment 19

7.2.       Unauthorised Late Submissions. 20

7.3.       Attendance. 20

7.4.       Extensions. 20

7.5.       Deferrals. 21

7.6.       Plagiarism and Bad Academic Practice. 21

7.7.       Return of Submitted Work. 22

7.8.       Proofreading. 22

7.9.       Style and Referencing. 22

7.10.         Faculty of Business and Law Grade Descriptors. 23

7.11.         Module Level Feedback. 24

  1. HOW WE SUPPORT YOU.. 24
  2. USEFUL LINKS AND CONTACTS. 24

Appendix 1: List of Organisations for Assignment 1. 27

Appendix 2: Leicester Castle Business School 32

Appendix 3: The Harvard System of Referencing. 33

 

 

 

1.   MODULE OUTLINE

 

1.1. The Teaching Team

 

Module team contact details are:

 

1- Prof Adel Hatamimarbini

Office: HU 4.103

Email: adel.hatamimarbini@dmu.ac.uk

Phone: 8396

Advice and feedback hours: Wednesdays 11.00am – 1.00pm (by appointment)

 

2- Dr Pegah Khoshnevis

Office: HU 5.83

Email: pegah.hajimirzakhoshnevis@dmu.ac.uk

Phone: 4647

Advice and feedback hours: TBA

 

3- Nima Garoosi Mokhtarzadeh

Email: nima.garoosimokhtarzadeh@dmu.ac.uk

Advice and feedback hours: TBA

 

4- Dr David Boye

Email: TBA

Advice and feedback hours: TBA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Each tutor holds advice and feedback hours for the benefit of a small group or individual discussions. The information can be also found under staff details on Blackboard. These hours might be subject to change, please check Blackboard for updated information

 

 

1.2. Module Aims and Objectives

This module aims to provide an understanding of the techniques and tools that are utilised to effectively and optimally produce and distribute the goods and services in business organisations and manufacturers. First, the module draws upon concepts and insights that are essential to comprehend the meaning of supply chain management (SCM), supply chain strategy, design of products and services and strategic capacity management. It then focuses on the basic practical details of operations and supply chain management such as SCM strategy, manufacturing and service processes, and supply and demand planning. This is an imperative aspect of operations in terms of maximising the effectiveness of the production process and reaching desired production results. Ultimately, the module presents a series of techniques to show the significance of planning in GOSCM and determine the best way to deliver the goods and services on-time and at low cost.

 

Overall, this module- through an experiential and formative learning process- provides you with an opportunity to reflect on your learning experiences to develop your critical consciousness and reflective analysis of the discipline.

 

Objectives and Learning Outcomes

By the end of this module you will be able to:

 

  • critically evaluate the role of operations and supply chain management in various types of business organisations,
  • understand the typical processes and important criteria for designing a product and service,
  • explain why capacity, quality, inventory, and procurement management are prominent for improving productivity,
  • understand and analyse a business process including manufacturing, service and logistics processes,
  • use analytical skills for problem-solving and decision-making, and
  • analyse the processes of different case studies, and make a distinction between manufacturing and service operations.

 

1.3. How It’s Going to Be Taught

 

The module has an arrangement framework of one-hour asynchronous lecture and 50 minutes of synchronous (face to face) seminars per week for 22 weeks.

Asynchronous lectures refer to online materials that you access in your own time. Each week you will be expected to access the materials in the learning materials folder for the week. Some material will be pre-recorded content that may introduce you to the main debates, concepts and issues in research methodology. The material will support the timetabled seminars. Asynchronous lectures will be connected to the key characteristics and knowledge components of the module, and will introduce key concepts, theories and techniques. Lectures will be accompanied and reinforced by extra 50-minute face to face seminar sessions to not only assist you with the illustration of concepts, theories and techniques, but also to develop your understanding and problem-solving skills in relation to real-world problems. The seminars also provide you with supporting and complete information regarding the assessment process with the aim of facilitating the preparation of your individual reports. Importantly, you may be asked through announcements on Blackboard to undertake some preparation and be supposed to be engaged in the classroom discussion. It is essential to spend at least 3-4 hours per week on your self-directed learning and studies to develop a deeper knowledge surrounding each subject and gain a basis for enhancing the level of your engagement in the lectures and tutorials. A set of appropriate reading materials and study resources such as recording lectures and further supportive readings will be continuously supplied on Blackboard.

 

The full lecture programme is given in Section 2.

 

Seminars will operate on a weekly basis and are designed to help you with the topic covered in that week’s lecture. They are an opportunity to solve any problems or clarify issues, which may be bothering you.  They are compulsory. Seminars will not continue or repeat the lecture, but allow you to practise and explore the concepts you have learnt from the lectures therefore, you are expected to have studied the relevant topic(s) prior to the seminar. To get the full benefit you need to engage in the seminar and come full of enthusiasm and questions.

 

Seminars will be an opportunity to cover any of the following material:

  • Pre-seminar reading and questions – Pre-seminar questions and answers are released with the lecture and students must familiarise themselves with the topic and questions before the seminar.
  • In-seminar work – This will also be released in advance of the seminar, but there is no requirement to complete it before the seminar but please familiarise yourself with the requirements before the seminar. You will only gain maximum benefit from the seminar if you have completed the lecture and pre-seminar work.
  • Solutions – Seminar solutions will be discussed in class.

 

You should attend the Seminar group allocated to you. Should you miss a seminar due to illness or encounter technical difficulties there will be a pre-recorded seminar available each week but students ideally should attend the timetabled seminar to allow full engagement in class discussions and the opportunity for questions.

 

The student charter sets out commitments from the university to students, from students to the university, and from the Students’ Union to students. You can consult it at:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/student-resources/student-charter/student-charter.aspx

 

 

1.4. How This Module Enhances Your Employability

This module aims to specialise students for entry-level jobs in managing the operations and distribution of goods and services. The GOSCM jobs such as plant manager, department store manager, supply chain manager, logistics manager, business process improvement analyst are trying to determine the best way to deliver the goods and services on-time and at low cost.

 

DMU has great ambitions for its students and alumni and we want you to have opportunities that match your ambitions. We offer a wide range of work experiences and now we want to make these even better.

DMUworks is our fresh programme to fit around what students, alumni and employers need, focusing on work experience opportunities that may be short, long, based in the UK or abroad – with options to suit different circumstances and aspirations. You can find out and sign up for DMUworks opportunities on MyGateway.

You can also find out further information about our projects by visiting the following webpage: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/careers-and-employability/careers-and-employability.aspx

 

1.5. Your Responsibility

Students are expected to engage, attend and participate in all asynchronous and timetabled synchronous activities.  Students are also encouraged to fully participate in the academic and cultural life of the Faculty and University, including guest lectures, seminars, public debates and external visits.

 

As students, your responsibilities are:

Preparation: Complete the required readings before coming to each timetabled session on this module and undertake the required follow-up work.

 

Participation: Participation in class is based on participation in class lectures/seminars, as well as group activities in class. To assist your engagement in class you should come prepared by writing down ideas, quotes, or concepts from the reading list that you find interesting as well as thought-provoking.  You should come prepared so that you can fully engage in class discussions and activities. If you are late to class, then please take the first available seat and settle yourself as quietly as possible.

 

Respect: Throughout your studies, it is important that you treat other students with respect as well as engaging in a respectful manner with academic staff. It is imperative that you listen to others and treat their contributions with respect, even if you disagree with them.  In particular, it is important that:

  • You are respectful of your peers’ learning and resist talking through seminars, workshops and lectures.
  • You do not answer your phone unless it is an emergency.
  • If you are late, then please take the first available seat and settle yourself as quietly as possible.

The student charter sets out commitments from the university to students, from students to the university, and from the Students’ Union to students. You can consult it at:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/student-resources/student-charter/student-charter.aspx

 

The module teaching and assessment team will contribute to this environment by:

  • Treating all students with respect.
  • Welcoming diverse viewpoints, experiences, and interpretations of the class materials.
  • Challenging your thinking, beliefs, and analysis of issues, concepts, and ideas in this class.

 

 

 

2.   LECTURE/SEMINAR SCHEDULE

 

Week Asynchronous lectures Timetabled seminars Core textbook
1 Module Introduction

Introduction to supply chain management (SCM) -AH

Tutorial 1.

Support for assessment 1 and ethics issue (individual report 1) and an interactive exercise

Chapters 1 and 2
2 Design of products and services-PK Tutorial 2. Group discussion and exercise on product and service design

 

Chapter 3
3 Strategic capacity management-PK Tutorial 3. Case Study: Shouldice Hospital

 

Chapter 5
4 Manufacturing Process- PK Tutorial 4.

Individual analysis and group discussion on the processes in manufacturers

Chapter 7
5 Service Process- PK Tutorial 5. Case study-Circuit Board Fabricators, Inc.

 

Chapter 9
6 Enhancement Week  
7 Facility Layout-NM Tutorial 6.  Analytical Practice-Designing a Manufacturing process

 

Chapter 8
8 Process design and analysis-Part 1- PK Tutorial 7. Individual analysis and group discussion on designing processes Chapter 11
9 Process design and analysis-Part 2-NM Tutorial 8. Casino Money-Handling Processes Chapter 11
10 TQM and Six Sigma quality- Part 1- NM Tutorial 9.

Group discussion

Q&A for assessment 1 (individual report 1)

Chapter 12
11 TQM and Six Sigma quality- Part 2-NM Tutorial 10.

Case study-Tesla’s Quality Challenge

Feedback

 

Chapter 12
12 Christmas holiday
13
14
15 Lean supply chain- Part 1-NM Tutorial 11. Group discussion and support for assessment 2 and ethics issue (individual report 2) Chapter 14
16 Lean Supply chain- Part 2-NM Tutorial 12. Value Stream Mapping Chapter 14
17 Logistics and transportation- Part 1-NM Tutorial 13. Transportation problem

 

Chapter 15
18 Logistics and transportation- Part 2-NM Tutorial 14. Analytics Exercise: Distribution Centre Location Chapter 15
19 Global sourcing and procurement- Part 1- DB Tutorial 15. Analytics Practice: Global Sourcing Decisions – Grainger Chapter 16
20 Global sourcing and procurement- Part 2- DB Tutorial 16. Procurement and Covid19 (Deloitte)

 

Chapter 16
21 Enterprise resource planning systems- Part 1- DB Tutorial 17.

Discussion on ERP

Chapter 17
22 Enhancement Week  
23 Enterprise resource planning systems- Part 2- DB Tutorial 18. Digital transformation wrt COVID19

 

Chapter 17
24 Inventory Management part I- DB Tutorial 19. Analytical Questions

Q&A for assessment 2 (individual report 2)

 

 

Chapter 20
25 Inventory Management part II- DB Tutorial 20.

Analytics Practice: Inventory Management at Big10Sweaters.com

Chapter 20
26 Material requirement planning- DB Tutorial 21. Discussion and exercise for MRP

 

Chapter 21
27 Overview and future operations challenges-AH Tutorial 22. Feedback

 

 

 

 

AH: Adel Hatamimarbini

PK: Pegah Khoshnevis

DB: David Boye

NM: Nima Mokhtarzadeh

 

 

3.   MODULE RESOURCE LIST

 

Core textbook

Jacobs, F.R., Chase R, B. (2018). Operations and Supply Chain Management, 15th Edition, McGraw Hill (International Edition).

 

Tip: The core module text will support you through a significant proportion of the lectures, providing important additional numerical examples for practice and further reading.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplementary textbooks

·         Slack, N., Brandon-Jones, A., Johnston, R. (2007, 2010 or 2016). Operations Management, 6th, 7th or 8th Edition. Pearson (available as an e-book in the library).

 

 

 

 

·         Heizer, J., Render, B., Munson, C. (2017). Operations Management: Sustainability and Supply Chain Management, 12th Edition, Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

·         Sanders, N. R. (2012). Supply Chain Management: A Global Perspective, NJ: John Wiley & Sons

 

 

 

 

4.   MODULE SUPPORT

Each weekly topic area will be divided into a number of activities that should be completed in numerical order. Students will be provided with a weekly activity list they are being asked to undertake. In addition, students will be supported in the following ways:

 

4.1.              BLACKBOARD AND MODULE COMMUNICATIONS

 

The module will be supported by DMU’s online learning on Blackboard and by DMUreplay.

 

Important information relating to this module can be found on Blackboard. This includes information on the module, lecture and seminar materials, all communications and announcements, as well as the procedure for submitting assignments via TurnitinUK.

 

You can access Blackboard by going to this link: https://vle.dmu.ac.uk

Login using the same username and password that you have for access to the University’s computer services.

 

Lecture material will be provided on Blackboard a minimum of one week in advance of the lecture to allow you to review and complete the activities prior to attendance at seminars. If desired students may want to print out lecture notes in the format suitable for their learning requirements.

 

Further information on Blackboard can be accessed from the Centre for Enhancing Learning through Technology (CELT): http://celt.our.dmu.ac.uk/blackboard/

 

If you have any difficulties logging into any computer on campus, then you should contact the Help Desk located on the 1st floor of the Kimberlin Library. In addition, you might contact the ITMS helpline (+44 (0)116 250 6050) or send an email to itmsservicedesk@dmu.ac.uk noting your name and degree programme).

 

4.2.              ADVICE AND FEEDBACK HOURS

The module team (see section 1.1 above or the staff contacts in Blackboard, for contact details) will also be available during weekly surgery hours to answer questions regarding the module. Advice and feedback hours will be offered in a variety of formats including question time via blackboard collaborate and Microsoft Team meetings. If students have the MS Teams app installed they can request an appointment by email and tutors will send the link for an MS Teams meeting in surgery hours.

The time and method of Advice and feedback hours will be published in the staff contacts section of Blackboard. Advice and feedback hours is not a replacement for lectures and seminars. Academic staff will expect you to have attempted lecture tasks and seminar work, or the assignment, before asking questions about it.

4.3.              LIBRARY SUPPORT

Adele Creak is our subject librarian and a specialist in books/journals for the subject area.  She is based in the Kimberlin Library, and can be contacted on adele.creak@dmu.ac.uk. Library Services and Study Guides are available in http://www.library.dmu.ac.uk/Support/Guides/.

 

4.4. STUDY SKILLS

The Centre for Learning and Study Support (CLaSS) are based in the Kimberlin Library and can provide a variety of small-group or one-to-one session aiding with essential study skills.

http://libguides.library.dmu.ac.uk/class

 

 

 

5.   ASSESSMENT BRIEFS

 

The assessment for this module consists of TWO elements:

 

  • First assessment–Individual Written Report 1 from taught topics in Term 1 weights 50% of the total marks

 

  • Second assessment Individual Written Report 2 from taught topics in Term 2 weights 50% of the total marks

 

These assessments aim to provide opportunities to assess both the surface and the deep learning and knowledge of students in subject-specific areas.

The assignment allows you to explore a modern supply chain in real-world organisations as well as seeking purposive solutions at low cost while satisfying your customers’ needs. Besides, your coursework helps you assess your understanding and knowledge of the typical processes and important techniques for designing, producing and distributing a product and service.

 

Please note that according to the DMU assessment policy, there is a University requirement for written coursework, at all levels, to be checked for originality using Turnitin where this is appropriate to the learning outcomes and assessment design. It is a web-based plagiarism detection tool widely used in UK universities and schools/ colleges. It searches the current and archived internet documents, papers submitted by other students, and identifies any similarities between texts.

 

There will be specific Turnitin Assignments for each assessment in the Assessment area of the Blackboard site. Students are required to upload an electronic version of their work (e.g. as a Microsoft Word document) by the submission date. Turnitin will then compare the submitted work with that of fellow students and against billions of items in its database collected from the Internet, journals and other sources.

 

Ensure that you upload the correct file as your submission cannot be deleted and the ‘correct’ file uploaded. It is your responsibility to ensure that the correct file is uploaded.

 

Importantly, paper or e-mailed copies of your work, whether draft, work in progress or completed, will not be accepted by your Tutor for review or as an official submission. Only documents/files uploaded to Turnitin will be accepted as an official submission.

 

5.1. General Guidance on Assessment 1

Keynotes:

  • Length: 1250 words
  • Deadline: 11: 59am Monday 17 January 2022
  • Submission: Turnitin ONLY
  • Weight: 50%

 

 

STEP 1: CHOOSE YOUR ORGANISATION

 

This assignment will take the form of a writing report and you will first need to select an international British company or an international organisation that one stage (e.g. supplier, manufacturer, etc.) of the supply chain is located and operated in the UK. Then, you will have to investigate a particular aspect(s) of the SCM practice (taught in Term 1) of your chosen organisation. It is expected to use the theory of your chosen topic learnt in Term 1 to assess the impact of Brexit including the pros and cons and discuss how your organisation can tackle the negative impacts on its supply chain.

 

Some excellent organisations are listed in Appendix 1 but importantly you have to check if they are active in the UK.

 

Your choice can be an organisation that is characterised by its good/not-so-good practices in the field of Operations and Supply Chain Management. It is highly recommended to select a company that is relevant to your degree and experience (e.g. Pharmaceuticals, Motor Vehicles and Parts, telecom, Commercial Banks or other hi-tech sectors etc.) as well.

 

STEP 2: ANALYSE YOUR ORGANISATION

 

  • Choose one of the following taught topics in Term 1
    • Design of products and services
    • Capacity management
    • Manufacturing process
    • Facility Layout
    • Process design and analysis
    • Quality management (TQM, 6sigma, …)

 

  • Rationale:
    • Start with an introduction and a very brief explanation of your rationale for a selected topic

 

  • Situation analysis (application of theories):
    • Examine the status quo of the chosen topic in detail in your organisation
    • Discuss the problems the organisation will have as a result of Brexit as well as describing possible ways coping with the problems
    • Elaborate other apparent problems/advantages/disadvantages you have found

 

Problem-solving:

  • Explain the details of your approaches the organisation might utilise with the aim of improving the efficiency or solving the current and coming problem(s) and support this with theories taught in Term 1. Importantly, argue that why you think your approaches are appropriate/inappropriate for this organisation.

 

5.2. General Guidance on Assessment 2

Keynotes:

  • Length: 1250 words
  • Deadline: 11: 59am Tuesday 3 May 2022
  • Submission: Turnitin ONLY
  • Weight: 50%

 

STEP 1: CHOOSE YOUR ORGANISATION

 

The coronavirus outbreak leads to shortages of components and raw materials and it is bound to be far worse than expected. British Airways, Automobile manufacturers, Apple, Starbucks, Ikea, international organisations, and other local SMEs have already frozen all or some of their operations around the world as the coronavirus claims more lives and increases business risk as well as uncertainty.

In this writing report assignment, you will first need to focus on a local, national or international organisation and study a given topic of the SCM practice (taught in Term 2) of your chosen organisation. The module team envisage that you leverage the theory you have learnt in Term 2 to assess the impact of coronavirus including the pros and cons and discuss how your organisation can tackle its negative effect on its supply chain and operations.

 

Critically evaluate, (using academic argument), the impact from coronavirus on global supply chain management practices. Possible topics include, but are not limited to

 

  • Actions taken to mitigate impacts and build resilience
  • During the crisis, how to be transparent on a supply chain and establish a list of critical components
  • Through the crisis, what’s the role of inventory management along the value chain
  • In the current landscape and after the crisis, what’s customer demand and buying behaviour of customers
  • In a time of crisis, discuss the importance of optimising production and distribution capacity

 

STEP 2: ANALYSE YOUR ORGANISATION

 

  • Choose one of the following taught topics in Term 2
  • Lean supply chain
  • Logistics and transportation
  • Global sourcing and procurement
  • Enterprise resource planning systems
  • Inventory Management
  • Material requirement planning

 

  • Rationale:
    • Start with an introduction and a very brief explanation of your rationale for a selected topic

 

  • Situation analysis (application of theories):
    • Examine the status quo of the chosen topic in detail in your organisation
    • Discuss those problems the organisation will have as a result of COVID19 as well as detecting possible optimal ways to attend to the problems
    • Elaborate other apparent problems/advantages/disadvantages you have found in the current uncertain situations
    • Lessons have been learnt by your organisation in the pandemic and how to prepare itself for the future crisis

 

Problem-solving:

  • Explain the details of your approaches the organisation might utilise with the aim of improving the efficiency or solving the current and coming problem(s) and support this with theories taught in Term 2. Importantly, argue that why you think your approaches are appropriate/inappropriate for this organisation.

 

 

Ethics Approval

Ethical approval is needed for any research undertaken by staff or students at the university that involves human participants, their tissue and /or their data. This is to ensure that the dignity, rights, safety and well-being of all participants (including yourself) are the primary consideration of the research project.

 

Your tutor will fully explain the ethics process required for this module prior to any data collection. Please note that full ethics approval is a mandatory requirement of the University and must be sought before the start of any data collection for any research project. Failure to do so may well affect the grade you receive.

 

 

Summary of report structure

It is suggested to follow the generally accepted following structure:

 

  • Title page
  • Contents page
  • Introduction
  • Main body (with sections to suit your report)
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Appendix (all must be referenced and prepared in maximum 3 pages)

 

Report style

  • All written work must be typed
  • Font Arial size 12 pt
  • Line spacing 1.5
  • Your work should be 1250 words in length (no less than 1125 words and no more than 1375 words).
  • Appendices are prepared in maximum 3 pages

 

General marking criteria for assessments 1 and 2

 

Aspect Mark
Definition and justification 16%
Situation analysis 30%
Problem solving 30%
Referencing 10%
Presentation 7%
Coherence 7%
Total 100%

 

Attentions:

  • Appendices include any documents or information which add to the reader’s understanding of the report. They should be given numbers and titles and listed in the contents. Refer to them in the appropriate places in the report, otherwise their relevance will not be clear.
  • Consider headings/sub-headings, margins and the spacing of sections
  • More guidance and support for assessment 1 will be given during the tutorials. Please make every effort to attend your online sessions.
  • All the research activity conducted by students within the Faculty of Business and Law requires ethics approval. Please complete the form (see http://www.dmu.ac.uk/research/ethics-and-governance/faculty-specific-procedures/business-and-law-ethics-procedures.aspx) and hand into your tutor BEFORE starting this assessment. The ethics form can also be found on Blackboard.

 

What to do in the event that Turnitin is not available:

 

  • Check the module site on Blackboard for any announcements regarding assignment submission.
  • If there are no announcements, notify your tutor, particularly if you experience problems within 24 hours of the assessment deadline. Wherever possible, do so using your DMU email account.
  • If the problems occurred during or after you submitted your work, keep the submission receipt (and receipt number) for the Turnitin submission. Also record any possible error messages displayed. If you are able to do so, take a picture or a screen-grab of the error message. Please include these in your email notification to the tutor.
  • If you are unable to upload your assignment due to Turnitin failure, please submit your work via email to the assessing tutor or the Module Leader to meet the original deadline.

 

Students will not be penalised for the late submission of work if there is a technical failure in the mechanism for submission (eg Blackboard).  If necessary, an alternative method of submission will be made available and a new deadline set.

 

5.3.              MARKING

Anonymous marking will be implemented for all forms of module assessment. All types of assessment will be subject to both internal and external moderation within the module teams and department, as well as by an academic member of staff external to the university.

 

6.   OUR ENGAGEMENT WITH YOU

 

The feedback that we receive from you is vital to the student experience. We gather this feedback through module and course surveys as well as via meetings and engagement with student representatives. Module and programme teams reflect on the comments that students provide and take action accordingly. If you have any comments about the module then you should consult the module leader in the first instance.

 

7.   ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS

 

7.1. Reassessment

If a student fails the module they may be eligible for reassessment of any other failed component as follows:

  • Students should ensure their availability for an August resit as failure to do so may have an impact on progression.

Students are automatically enrolled onto reassessments as per the University’s regulations but there is no right to reassessment in a low-scoring, but passed, assessment.

The assignments on a module must be completed and in the case of an assignment mark less than 40%, the students can resubmit their assignments. The mark on a resubmission is capped at 40%.

 

Students failing to achieve an aggregate grade of 40% across the various assessed components may be re-assessed during the summer re-assessment period. This opportunity will only be offered if their grade profile permits re-assessment (as determined by the Marketing Assessment Board).

 

7.2. Unauthorised Late Submissions

If an assessment is submitted later than the deadline without an approved extension or deferral the mark received will be capped. If an assessment is submitted 1-14 calendar days late the mark for the work will be capped at the pass mark of 40% for undergraduate modules. If an assessment is submitted beyond 14 calendar days late the work will receive a mark of zero per cent.

 

This policy uses:

  • Actual days rather than working days (Since a weekend and Bank Holidays, gives students real extra days)
  • A single penalty for work that is handed in late, but up to 7 days late.
  • The definition of ‘late’ in the Business School will continue to be after 4 p.m. to the SAC in the Business School on the date for submission; in the Law School, the coursework boxes will continue to be opened at the beginning of the day after the submission date and ‘late’ will be any work not in the box by that time.
  • Submission’: From the Academic year 2017/18, all coursework is to be submitted electronically.
  • Remember: all applications for late submission of assignments must be made in writing to the Module leader (or designated deputy) for authorisation, using the appropriate University form. Any late submissions not authorised in writing by the Module leader (or deputy) will incur the penalties outlined above.

 

7.3. Attendance

Attendance and engagement in all learning activities are expected in all Faculty of Business and Law modules. You are expected to attend all timetabled sessions. In order to register your attendance, it is important that you sign the register in class or swipe your student card against the reader (in rooms fitted with card readers). Fraudulent use of student cards for attendance monitoring ie swiping in other students who are not in attendance or asking other students to swipe your card when you are not in attendance, will not be tolerated.  If you are caught doing this, you will be asked to attend a meeting with the Associate Dean Academic and if found in breach of university regulations, this may be recorded on your student record. Please note that you will be recorded as absent if your attendance is not recorded at your timetabled activities.  Your attendance will be monitored weekly; if you miss classes you will be contacted by the Faculty, initially by email (to your University email address) and thereafter, if you fail to respond and/or you continue to miss classes, by post to your term-time and permanent address. Monitoring your attendance allows us to identify and assist students who are experiencing difficulties. You will be expected to respond promptly to any correspondence we send you; failure to do so could result in termination of your student registration.

 

7.4. Extensions

Extensions to relevant deadlines are only granted where there is a satisfactory explanation provided in advance. The process is as follows:

 

  1. Students make their request 24 hours in advance of the deadline using theforms on AskBAL.
  2. The forms will be reviewed by the Student Advice Centre
  3. Extensions of up to 10 working days will be approved by the Student Advice Centre provided students meet the requirements
  4. Only complex cases, or those which require further information will be referred to the AHA or Module Leader
  5. The Student Advice Centre will contact the student directly with the decision

 

Module Leaders and Programme Leaders will no longer approve or record extension or deferral requests. For more information on the extensions and approvals regulations, please see here.

 

7.5. Deferrals

If your circumstances are such that an extension of 10 working days would not be sufficient, or if you feel that, despite being granted an extension of up to 10 working days, your performance in a piece of coursework has been seriously impaired, you may apply formally to your faculty panel for a deferral of assessment of coursework. The process is as follows:

 

  1. Students make their request 24 hours in advance of the deadline using theforms on AskBAL.
  2. The Student Advice Centre will contact the student directly with the decision
  3. All students granted deferrals will be expected to take their assessments at the next available opportunity. Should this not be possible for Covid-related reasons, a further deferral should be sought.

 

It is recommended that all students consult their Student Advice Centre to discuss their circumstances before submitting a deferral request. For more information on the extensions and approvals regulations, please see here.

 

7.6. Plagiarism and Bad Academic Practice

 

De Montfort University’s Academic Regulations describe plagiarism as:

“the significant use of other people’s work and the submission of it as though it were one’s own in assessed coursework (such as dissertations, essays, experiments etc.)”.

 

This includes:

  • Copying from another student’s work
  • Copying text from sources such as books or journals without acknowledgement
  • Downloading information and/or text from the Internet and using it without acknowledgement
  • Submitting work which you claim to be your own when it has been produced by a group
  • Submitting group work without acknowledging all contributors.

 

De Montfort University describes bad academic practice as:

  • Low level duplication without citation for example errors made through carelessness or misunderstanding or
  • Passing off ideas, data or other information as if originally discovered by the student.

 

Information on academic offences can be found at:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/academic-offences.aspx

 

Further advice on academic offences can be obtained by emailing acasupportoffice@dmu.ac.uk Full details can be found in the University regulations http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/student-regulations.aspx

 

Students are reminded that module assessment results are provisional until ratified by the programme management boards and that results released to students can be revised or redacted if there are concerns regarding academic practices.

 

7.7. Return of Submitted Work

All students will be informed via a Blackboard announcement when their assessment is marked. You are strongly encouraged to discuss your written or in some cases audio feedback with your module leader if you have any questions or concerns. Modules assessed wholly or in part by examination may have generic feedback on examination performance made available via Blackboard.

 

All marks on assessed work are provisional marks only and they will not be confirmed until the Assessment Board meets. Marks and feedback on assessed work will be available within 20 days. The turnaround time does not include weekends, bank holidays or university closure days

The full Assessment and Feedback policy can be consulted at:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/quality-management-and-policy/academic-quality/learning-teaching-assessment/assessment-feedback-policy.aspx

 

Good academic conduct and discipline: All students are expected to adhere to the University’s regulations in relation to expected standards of behaviour.

 

Information on student regulations can be viewed at:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/student-regulations.aspx

Academic Practice Officer (APO):

The faculty’s APO is Bob Webber and his contact details are as follows:

          Bob Webber               HU5.99          BWebber@dmu.ac.uk             Ext 6208

Further advice on academic offences can be obtained by emailing acasupportoffice@dmu.ac.uk Full details can be found in the University regulations

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/student-regulations.aspx

 

7.8. Proofreading

If you do use a third party to proofread your work or a professional proof reading service you must discuss this with your tutor and declare this in a written statement accompanying your work when you submit it for assessment.

 

7.9. Style and Referencing

Students in the Faculty of Business and Law follow specific referencing guides for all written work.  There is a guideline for students in the Leicester Castle Business School (https://libguides.library.dmu.ac.uk/business/referencing).

 

Leicester Castle Business School students follow the Harvard referencing system:

http://www.library.dmu.ac.uk/Images/Selfstudy/Harvard.pdf

 

7.10.            Faculty of Business and Law Grade Descriptors

This is a guide to the criteria used by staff in the Faculty of Business and Law assigning a mark to a piece of undergraduate work.  The final mark awarded to a piece of work will be informed by its predominant correspondence to these descriptors.  The University generic descriptors as well as advice for students can be accessed at:

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/quality-management-and-policy/academic-quality/learning-teaching-assessment/mark-descriptors.aspx

 

Modules are marked on a range of 0-100%.  Mark descriptors are given in the table below.  A mark below 40% indicates a Fail grade (the shaded boxes).

 

Mark Range Criteria
90-100% Indicates that no fault can be found with the work other than very minor errors, for example typographical, or perhaps failure to satisfy the most challenging and exacting demands of the assessment.
80-89% Indicates a very high level of understanding evidenced by an ability to engage critically and analytically with source material.  Likely to exhibit independent lines of argument. Only minor errors or omissions.
70-79% Judged to be very good, yet not outstanding. May contain minor errors or omissions. A well-developed response showing clear knowledge and the ability to interpret and/or apply that knowledge.
60-69% Indicates a sound understanding of basic points and principles but with some failure to express or to apply them properly. Hence the answer is essentially correct, has some errors or omissions, and is not seriously flawed.
50-59% Indicates a more limited understanding of basic points and principles, with significant errors and omissions.  These errors and omissions, however, do not cast doubt on the basic level of understanding.
40-49% Indicates questionable understanding of basic points and principles yet sufficient to show that learning outcomes have been achieved at a rudimentary level.
30-39% Indicates an answer that shows only weakly developed elements of understanding.  The learning outcomes have been insufficiently realised.
20-29% Very little knowledge has been demonstrated and the presentation shows little coherence of material or argument.
0-19% Only isolated or no knowledge displayed.

 

7.11.            Module Level Feedback

Your feedback helps guide the choices the University will make. Your opinions are essential to ensure that we provide every student with the best possible education. The Module Level Feedback (MLF) survey is one way we gather student feedback on your teaching and learning experience. The feedback you give us via the MLF helps us to meet your needs at module level as well as programme level. It lets us know what kind of enhancements will mean the most to you during your time here. This survey is confidential and administered online; you will be invited to complete this before the end of your module. The questions ask you to evaluate your teaching and learning experience for each module you take on a five-point scale from ‘Definitely Agree’ to ‘Definitely Disagree’.  Questions  cover the following topics (you can see the full list of questions at Module Level Feedback ):

  • Teaching
  • The learning environment
  • Learning outcomes
  • Assessment and feedback
  • Organisation and management
  • Learning resources
  • Overall learning / educational experience

You will also have the opportunity to tell us about the module’s best aspects, what can be improved or what should be changed.

 

8.   HOW WE SUPPORT YOU

 

Sometimes things happen that are beyond your control, for example, illness or personal problems.  If things start to affect your studies, you need to let someone know.  There are processes and people to help you.

 

Your personal tutor is an important starting point for help.  He or she will be able to advise you about the various University procedures.  Many things can be dealt with by your Programme Leader. Academic matters within the Faculty are led by the Associate Dean Academic in conjunction with Associate Professor Student Experience. The staff in the Student Advice Centre are there to provide support and guidance.

 

There are in addition a number of sources of help that are listed in the Useful Links and Contacts section below, such as the Student Gateway.

 

9.   USEFUL LINKS AND CONTACTS

 

Careers Service:

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/careers-and-employability/careers-and-employability.aspx

 

Counselling and Wellbeing

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/counselling-mental-health-and-wellbeing/counselling/counselling.aspx

 

Disability Advice and Support

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/disability-advice-and-support/disability-advice-and-support.aspx

 

Student Advice Centre

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/schools-and-departments/leicester-business-school/contact-us.aspx

 

Student Finance and Welfare

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/student-finance-and-welfare/student-finance-and-welfare.aspx

 

Student support

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/undergraduate-study/student-support/student-support.aspx

 

Students’ Union

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/welcome-to-de-montfort-students-union/welcome-to-de-montfort-students-union.aspx

 

Support for Mature Students

Website: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/undergraduate-study/student-support/advice-and-guidance-for-mature-students/advice-and-guidance-for-mature-students.aspx

 

The Student Gateway

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/student-and-academic-services.aspx

 

Other Services and Links

 

Academic Appeals

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/academic-appeals.aspx

 

Change in student circumstance (e.g. suspension of studies) –

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/student-finance-and-welfare/changes-affecting-finances/taking-a-break.aspx

 

Complaints Procedure

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/the-student-gateway/academic-support-office/student-complaints/student-complaints-procedure.aspx

 

Information Technology and Media Services (ITMS)

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/professional-services/information-technology-and-media-services/service-desk.aspx

 

Nightline

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/student-resources/it-and-media/24-hour-support.aspx

 

Student Code of Conduct

https://www.dmu.ac.uk/Documents/DMU-students/Academic-Support-Office/Student-Code-of-Conduct.pdf

 

 

 

Appendix 1: List of Organisations for Assignment 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gartner Supply Chain Top 25 List (2018)

 

1. Unilever

2. Inditex

3.Cisco Systems

4.Colgate-Palmolive

5.Intel

6.Nike

7.Nestle

8.PepsiCo

9.H&M

10.Starbucks

11.3M

12.Schneider Electric

13.Novo Nordisk

14.HP Inc.

15.L’Oréal

16.Diageo

17.Samsung Electronics

18.Johnson & Johnson

19.BASF

20.Walmart Inc.

21.Kimberly-Clark

22.Coca-Cola Company

23.Home Depot

24.Adidas

25.BMW

 

 

 

 Appendix 2: Leicester Castle Business School

 

 

Our Mission Our Vision Our Values
 

To transform lives in our global community of students, staff and partners through outstanding education and research

To go beyond business as usual by fostering creative, distinctive and pioneering solutions to real-world problems

To promote the public good through critical analysis of the purpose of business and through active engagement in initiatives aimed at tackling business, social and community challenges

 

Through our unsurpassed commitment to the public good and transformational scholarship, we will position ourselves as the definition of a 21st century global Business School

 

LEADERSHIP: Confidence and courage to shape a better future

INTEGRITY: Taking personal pride in our work

CREATIVITY: Thinking beyond the usual and embracing ideas

GLOBAL MINDEDNESS: Finding opportunities in our diversity

COMMUNITY: Realising the purpose and power of business

 

 Appendix 3: The Harvard System of Referencing

 

 

It is extremely important to develop a professional approach to written academic work. The mark you get for a piece of work will be affected by the professionalism with which it is presented. One aspect of professionalism in academic work is clear referencing of source material. When presenting any serious piece of academic work such as a presentation, an essay, a report or a dissertation, you must be able to show that you have used appropriate sources of information and considered relevant theories and debates within the field. To be able to do this you must be able to show where you have got your information and ideas from. If you do not indicate your sources clearly, then at best your work will be regarded as being of inferior quality, and at worst you may lay yourself open to a charge of plagiarism.

 

In order to indicate the sources of your information, you need to use a system of referencing. There are many different systems of referencing, known as conventions. The system that you should use is that which is most widely used by academics studying business and management. This is the Harvard system. It is explained below.

 

Quoting from a source. Sometimes you will want to quote the exact words from a book or article because

  • You want to use it as evidence to support your argument
  • You want to use it to illustrate your argument

 

When you are quoting from a source you indicate this by putting the phrase or sentence in single quotation marks followed by the author’s name, the date of publication and the page number from which the quote is taken.

 

Example: Numerical labour flexibility is defined as the ‘ability to adjust the level of labour inputs to meet fluctuations in output’ (Atkinson and Meager, 1986, p.3).

 

Long quotes, of more than two or three lines, should be set apart from the main text, indented without quotation marks, and single spaced.

 

Example:  From some employers’ points of view, there may be good reasons for not attempting to introduce the sophisticated policies for managing employees that are associated with Human resource Management. As one writer has observed:

 

Why should managers persist with complex, often delicate, schemes to involve workers in production systems, when the grim state of the market required swift and abrasive action? Far quicker and cheaper to play on employees’ fears and kick a few arses, while trusting that the law has taken care of the unions (Dunn, 1993, p. 18).

 

Citing a source. Sometimes you will want to refer to someone’s work without reproducing their exact words. For instance, you may want to explain in your own words a point that someone else has made, or you may want to indicate the source of information upon which you have based your argument or observation. In this case you would make the point in your own words, followed by the author’s name in brackets, usually without a page number.

 

Example: Research evidence shows that part-time workers are concentrated in low-skilled, low-paid jobs (Legge, 1998).

 

Quoting or citing works by multiple authors. Sometimes the book or article that you want to reference has been co-written by a large number of authors. If you include all their names this will look very messy on the page. Therefore if there are more than two or three co-authors you should use the first named author followed by et al. This is a Latin abbreviation meaning ‘and others’.

 

Example: Rather than (Gallie, White, Cheng and Tomlinson, 1998), you would put (Gallie et al, 1998).

 

Quoting or citing authors in edited books. Some books consist of chapters or essays written by different authors, the whole collection having been put together by an editing author. When referring to such work, you should reference the name of the author of the individual chapter or essay, not that of the editing author. For example, the textbook edited by Ian Beardwell and Len Holden, Human Resource Management: a Contemporary Approach is made up of chapters by different authors. Therefore if you wished to quote from or cite material from a chapter of that book, the reference would be to the author of that chapter, not to Beardwell and Holden.

 

Your references should only include works that you have actually consulted yourself.  The following example is appropriate if you have not read Dunlop but you have read Blyton and Turnbull:

 

Example: Dunlop argued that industrial relations could best be analysed from the perspective of systems theory (Blyton and Turnbull, 1994).

 

Your list of references

 

Having referenced your sources by author and date of publication in the main body of your essay, report or dissertation, you should list the full details of those references in alphabetical order at the end of it. Each reference should be single-spaced, with double spaces between each reference.

 

Titles of books and names of journals and newspapers should be underlined or italicized. Titles of articles in journals or chapters in edited books should be put in single quotation marks.

 

Books with only one author: author’s surname, followed by initials and then date of publication (in brackets). Then the title of the book, underlined or italicised as in the example below. Then the place of publication and the name of the publisher. All this information can be found on the inner title page of the book you are using. If you are referring to a second or third edition of the book, this should be indicated after the title.

 

Example: Legge, K. (1995) Human Resource Management; Rhetorics and Realities. Basingstoke: Macmillan.

 

Books with more than one author:

Gallie, D., White, M., Cheng, Y. and Tomlinson, M. (1998) Restructuring the Employment Relationship. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

 

Chapters or essays in edited collections: page numbers of the chapter should be included at the end of the details. Note that while the title of the book has initial capital letters, the title of the individual chapter does not.

 

Example: Claydon, T. (2001) ‘HRM and the labour market’, in I. Beardwell and L. Holden (eds), Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Approach. 3rd edition, London: Financial Times/Prentice-Hall, pp. 69-123.

 

Articles in periodicals and journals: Author’s surname followed by initials, then date of publication (in brackets). Then the title of the article or report, followed by the name of the journal, underlined or italicised. This should be followed by the volume number, part number, if any (in brackets), and the page numbers of the article. Note that the name of the journal has capital initial letters but the title of the article does not.

 

Example: Holden, L. (1996) ‘HRM and employee involvement in Britain and Sweden: a comparative study’, International Journal of Human Resource Management, 7(1), pp.59-81.

 

Newspaper articles: Where the article has a named author you should supply author’s surname followed by initials and (in brackets) year of publication. Then the title of the newspaper, underlined or italicised, the day and month of that edition of the paper, and finally the page number.

 

Example: Dunn, S. (1993) ‘Hard times for workers’ rights’, Guardian, 19 May, p. 18.

 

Where there is no named author, just put Guardian, 19 May, 1993, p. 18

 

  • Citing from electronic information.

 

If you are planning to refer to material you have found on the Internet in your assignment, presentation or dissertation, you must provide enough information so that, in theory at least, any reader can trace your references back to where they appeared originally. There is no agreed and fixed standard for electronic references, so this guide adapts guidelines used at South Bank and Bournemouth Universities for citing using the Harvard System, which is currently used for books and journals. There are a number of web sites, which consider electronic referencing, so you might also want to have a look at the following:

 

Referencing electronic sources (South Bank University)

http://www.sbu.ac.uk/lis/helpsheets/lrc2.html

 

A guide to citing Internet sources (Bournemouth University)

http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/service-depts/lis/LIS_Pub/harvardsystint.html

 

Excerpts from final draft international standard ISO 690-2

http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/iso/tc46sc9/standard/690-2e.htm

 

What should an electronic reference include?

 

Information needed for a complete and accurate reference should normally include:

 

  • Author’s name and initials (if more than one, list them). Much information is put up on the Internet by organisations without citing a specific author. In such cases, use the smallest identifiable organisational unit as the author.

 

  • Year of publication. Write [No date] or [n.d.] when the electronic publication date is not available. It is often harder to find the date of an Internet resource, and this is important to consider when assessing its usefulness as an information source.

 

  • Title of the document being cited, with an edition or version number if later than the first. The title of a web page will normally be the main heading on the page, or in the blue strip at the top of the screen. The title of messages/postings is the subject line.

 

  • Medium or Type of resource – to show that this is not a printed book or article. The rules of citation are based around the assumption that everything is paper-based – unless you say it isn’t.

 

  • Location – URL, ftp address, etc. – wherever the user has to go to in order to locate the document in question

 

  • Publisher (optional) The term publisher is used here to cover both the traditional idea of a publisher of printed sources, as well as organisations responsible for maintaining sites on the Internet, such as the BBC or De Montfort University.

 

  • Commands needed to locate the document (if relevant). You might also want to indicate the search strategy you adopted to find the material.

 

  • Date accessed – essential if a document is likely to change or move; for e-mails or newsgroups use posting date, to allow tracing of message through archives. The ‘accessed date’ is the date on which you viewed or downloaded the document. This allows for any subsequent modifications to the document common with this medium of communication.

 

 

CD-ROM databases

 

Only cite full-text items from CD-ROM databases – if you get an abstract, you should find the full version elsewhere and refer to that.

 

AUTHOR, INITIALS (year) Article title. Periodical name, volume (part) / date, pages. [CD-ROM] CD-ROM title used, Version/Date

 

Example:

KING, J (1996) Revenge of the IS worker in Computerworld, October 7th, p.1 [CD-ROM] Computer Select, December 1996

 

  • Getting organized.

 

You will have noticed that you need to supply a lot of information about your sources; author, title, date and place of publication, volume and part numbers in the case of journals, and very often page numbers. This means that when you are reading and note-taking you should start by making a note of all these details so that you can refer to them when finalising your work. It is easy to forget this and very time-consuming to have to go checking back if you do, so be methodical in your approach to note-taking. Always write down the full details of the source that you are taking notes from when you start. It will save a lot of time and effort later on.

Effective Communication And Collaboration

Effective Communication And Collaboration
Your project team is charged with implementing a new customer relationship management (CRM) software application within the next 30 days. The intended consequence of successfully implementing the CRM program is to provide both your sales and customer service departments more agility and flexibility with engaging existing and prospective customers. The directive from executive leadership is to partner with at least one sales person and one customer service representative in addition to the team members from IT.

Effective Communication And Collaboration

As a CLC team, you will need to select which member of your team will serve as the sales person, which member will serve as the customer service representative, and which member(s) will serve as members from IT. Consider the vision for what a successful project team looks like in an organizational setting. Determine the needs of the various stakeholder groups (e.g., sales department, customer service, and IT). Assess the competing agendas of each stakeholder and determine the strategies that the team will use to address and resolve conflict in order to create a win-win scenario for all involved. Further, determine which strategies will be most effective for implementing the CRM software, training and developing employees, and achieving the 30-day target for implementation.

Create a PowerPoint presentation (10-12 slides) with speaker notes, a justification, and summary of the decision-making process that addresses the following:

Create a team charter and outline the elements (e.g., communication types and styles, decision-making process, conflict management, etc.) the team believes are essential for the successful implementation of the CRM application.

Outline the various needs of each stakeholder group (e.g., sales, customer service, and IT). Describe the challenges of competing agendas from each stakeholder group. What needs are alike/similar? What needs require conflict management and resolution in order to successfully implement the CRM program?

Describe how value is created for each stakeholder group. In what ways will the team positively affect the business as a whole?

Describe the communication types and styles that will be used within the project team. Determine how the communication types and styles described will lead to success.

What strategies your team will employ to adequately train and develop employees to use the new CRM program effectively?

Describe how your project team worked together (collaborated) to achieve the common goal of successfully implementing the CRM program.

You are required to use at least three academic references to support your reasoning for the aforementioned components in the team selection process.

While APA style is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

Additional information:

Create a team charter and outline the elements (e.g., communication types and styles, decision-making process, conflict management, etc.) the team believes are essential for the successful implementation of the CRM application.

Outline the various needs of each stakeholder group (e.g., sales, customer service, and IT). Describe the challenges of competing agendas from each stakeholder group. What needs are alike/similar? What needs require conflict management and resolution in order to successfully implement the CRM program?

I see that we have our first CLC project coming up and it looks to be a 10-12 slide powerpoint. There are 6 points to be made:

Create a team charter and outline the elements (e.g., communication types and styles, decision-making process, conflict management, etc.) the team believes are essential for the successful implementation of the CRM application.
Outline the various needs of each stakeholder group (e.g., sales, customer service, and IT). Describe the challenges of competing agendas from each stakeholder group. What needs are alike/similar? What needs require conflict management and resolution in order to successfully implement the CRM program?
Describe how value is created for each stakeholder group. In what ways will the team positively affect the business as a whole?
Describe the communication types and styles that will be used within the project team. Determine how the communication types and styles described will lead to success.
What strategies your team will employ to adequately train and develop employees to use the new CRM program effectively?
Describe how your project team worked together (collaborated) to achieve the common goal of successfully implementing the CRM program.
We each take two points and create at least 3 slides to cover our topics. We will need a leader to compile the slides and submit the presentation after it is completed. We can post it to this forum for final review but I would suggest that all the slides need to be done before Tuesday at 8 central time so we can compile them and make any changes before final submission. I will take whatever part I need to but I would like to do 3 and 4 if possible. It is really hard for me to do submissions though because Wednesdays are usually my busiest days at work. I tend to make up work or get ahead on the weekends just to be able to make it through the week with my studies.

Create a team charter and outline the elements (e.g., communication types and styles, decision-making process, conflict management, etc.) the team believes are essential for the successful implementation of the CRM application.

Outline the various needs of each stakeholder group (e.g., sales, customer service, and IT). Describe the challenges of competing agendas from each stakeholder group. What needs are alike/similar? What needs require conflict management and resolution in order to successfully implement the CRM program?

Effective Communication And Collaboration

Create an order via https://peakassignments.com/order if you need work on such topic and many more from different disciplines.

 

Data Integrity and Security

Data Integrity and Security
Discuss the principles of data integrity, professional ethics, and legal requirements related to data security, regulatory requirements, confidentiality, and client’s right to privacy.

Grading Rubric for Writing Assignment

Your professor may use a slightly different rubric, but the standard rubric at AUR will assess your writing according to the following standards:

 

 

  A (4) B (3) C (2) D/F (1/0)
Focus: Purpose Purpose is clear Shows awareness of purpose Shows limited awareness of purpose No awareness
Main idea Clearly presents a There is a main idea Vague sense of a No main idea
  main idea and supported throughout main idea, weakly  
  supports it most of the paper. supported  
  throughout the   throughout the  
  paper.   paper.  
Organization: Well-planned and Good overall There is a sense of No sense of
Overall well-thought out. organization, includes organization, organization
  Includes title, the main although some of the  
  introduction, organizational tools. organizational tools  
  statement of main   are used weakly or  
  idea, transitions and   Missing  
  conclusion.      
Organization: All paragraphs have Most paragraphs have Some paragraphs Para. lack clear ideas
Paragraphs clear ideas, are clear ideas, are have clear ideas,  
  supported with supported with some support from  
  examples and have examples and have examples may be  
  smooth transitions. transitions. missing and  
      transitions are weak.  
Content Exceptionally well- Well-presented and Content is sound and Content is not sound
  presented and argued; ideas are solid; ideas are  
  argued; ideas are detailed, developed present but not  
  detailed, well- and supported with particularly  
  developed, evidence and details, developed or  
  supported with mostly specific. supported; some  
  specific evidence &   evidence, but  
  facts, as well as   usually of a  
  examples and   generalized nature.  
  specific details.      
Research (if Sources are Sources are well Sources support The paper does not
assignment exceptionally well- integrated and some claims made in use adequate
includes a integrated and they support the paper’s the paper, but might research or if it does,
research support claims claims. There may be not be integrated the sources are not
component) argued in the paper occasional errors, but well within the integrated well.
  very effectively. the sources and paper’s argument. They are not cited
  Quotations and Works Cited conform There may be a few correctly according
  Works Cited to MLA style sheet. errors in MLA to MLA style, nor
  conform to MLA   style.. listed correctly on
  style sheet.     the Works Cited
        page.
Style: Sentence Sentences are clear Sentences are clear Sentences are Sentences aren’t
structure and varied in but may lack generally clear but clear
  pattern, from simple variation; a few may may have awkward  
  to complex, with be awkward and there structure or unclear  
  excellent use of may be a few content; there may  
  punctuation. punctuation errors. be patterns of  
      punctuation errors.  
Style: Word There is clear use of There is an attempt at There is little No attempt at style
choice, Tone a personal and a personal style but attempt at style;  
  unique style of style of writing may reads as flat and  
  writing, suited to be awkward or perhaps  
  audience and unsuited to audience uninteresting in  
  purpose; the paper and purpose; the content, which is  
  holds the reader’s reader may lose usually generalized  
  interest with ease. interest in some and clichéd.  
    sections of the paper.    
Style: Details Large amounts of Some use of specific Little use of specific No use of examples
and Examples specific examples examples and examples and  
  and detailed detailed descriptions. details; mostly  
  descriptions. May have extended generalized  
    examples that go on examples and little  
    for too long. description.  
Grammar & Excellent grammar, A few errors in Shows a pattern of Continuous errors
Mechanics spelling, syntax and grammar, spelling, errors in spelling,  
  punctuation. syntax and grammar, syntax  
    punctuation, but not and/or punctuation.  
    many. Could also be a sign  
      of lack of proof-  
      reading.  

 

 

 

 

 

Data Integrity and Security

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Relevant Agencies And Organizations

Relevant Agencies And Organizations

Describe which areas and departments should have standards, and what kind of standards they should have. Explain the importance of having different standards throughout various departments. Describe relevant agencies and organizations that determine and monitor the standards.

Grading Rubric for Writing Assignment

Your professor may use a slightly different rubric, but the standard rubric at AUR will assess your writing according to the following standards:

 

 

  A (4) B (3) C (2) D/F (1/0)
Focus: Purpose Purpose is clear Shows awareness of purpose Shows limited awareness of purpose No awareness
Main idea Clearly presents a There is a main idea Vague sense of a No main idea
  main idea and supported throughout main idea, weakly  
  supports it most of the paper. supported  
  throughout the   throughout the  
  paper.   paper.  
Organization: Well-planned and Good overall There is a sense of No sense of
Overall well-thought out. organization, includes organization, organization
  Includes title, the main although some of the  
  introduction, organizational tools. organizational tools  
  statement of main   are used weakly or  
  idea, transitions and   Missing  
  conclusion.      
Organization: All paragraphs have Most paragraphs have Some paragraphs Para. lack clear ideas
Paragraphs clear ideas, are clear ideas, are have clear ideas,  
  supported with supported with some support from  
  examples and have examples and have examples may be  
  smooth transitions. transitions. missing and  
      transitions are weak.  
Content Exceptionally well- Well-presented and Content is sound and Content is not sound
  presented and argued; ideas are solid; ideas are  
  argued; ideas are detailed, developed present but not  
  detailed, well- and supported with particularly  
  developed, evidence and details, developed or  
  supported with mostly specific. supported; some  
  specific evidence &   evidence, but  
  facts, as well as   usually of a  
  examples and   generalized nature.  
  specific details.      
Research (if Sources are Sources are well Sources support The paper does not
assignment exceptionally well- integrated and some claims made in use adequate
includes a integrated and they support the paper’s the paper, but might research or if it does,
research support claims claims. There may be not be integrated the sources are not
component) argued in the paper occasional errors, but well within the integrated well.
  very effectively. the sources and paper’s argument. They are not cited
  Quotations and Works Cited conform There may be a few correctly according
  Works Cited to MLA style sheet. errors in MLA to MLA style, nor
  conform to MLA   style.. listed correctly on
  style sheet.     the Works Cited
        page.
Style: Sentence Sentences are clear Sentences are clear Sentences are Sentences aren’t
structure and varied in but may lack generally clear but clear
  pattern, from simple variation; a few may may have awkward  
  to complex, with be awkward and there structure or unclear  
  excellent use of may be a few content; there may  
  punctuation. punctuation errors. be patterns of  
      punctuation errors.  
Style: Word There is clear use of There is an attempt at There is little No attempt at style
choice, Tone a personal and a personal style but attempt at style;  
  unique style of style of writing may reads as flat and  
  writing, suited to be awkward or perhaps  
  audience and unsuited to audience uninteresting in  
  purpose; the paper and purpose; the content, which is  
  holds the reader’s reader may lose usually generalized  
  interest with ease. interest in some and clichéd.  
    sections of the paper.    
Style: Details Large amounts of Some use of specific Little use of specific No use of examples
and Examples specific examples examples and examples and  
  and detailed detailed descriptions. details; mostly  
  descriptions. May have extended generalized  
    examples that go on examples and little  
    for too long. description.  
Grammar & Excellent grammar, A few errors in Shows a pattern of Continuous errors
Mechanics spelling, syntax and grammar, spelling, errors in spelling,  
  punctuation. syntax and grammar, syntax  
    punctuation, but not and/or punctuation.  
    many. Could also be a sign  
      of lack of proof-  
      reading.  

 

 

 

 

Relevant Agencies And Organizations

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Process Of Investigation And Prosecution

Process Of Investigation And Prosecution
Understanding due process in the trial process is very complex and extends not only through the process of investigation and prosecution of the accused, but also to the sentencing and punishment phase of the system.

For this assignment, you will be required to select one of the three subsections of sentencing safeguards (bifurcation, proportionality, or cruel and unusual punishment) and create a PowerPoint presentation that outlines the evolution of this protection starting with the Constitution and tracking the case law that shapes the modern application of the safeguards in criminal procedure.

Imagine that you will be presenting this to an audience in a room with the presentation projected on the wall. Make sure that all your fonts are at least 28 points, and that you have reduced the amount of reading to a minimum. The notes section of the PowerPoint should contain your narrative that is essentially a script for the presentation.

Graphics should be used as needed and be professional. Use the availability on the slide wisely, and remember that you have someone in the third row trying to see what you have created, so choose a background that will provide a high contrast with the text.

It should be a minimum of 12 slides, but no more than 15 slides, not counting the title and references slides. The case law should be restricted only to US Supreme Court cases with rulings that deal with the sentencing safeguards from the lecture material.

Each slide must contain at least four bulleted items of information.

You must follow APA guidelines for the citation of your sources, both in-text and on your reference slide.

Grading Rubric for Writing Assignment

Your professor may use a slightly different rubric, but the standard rubric at AUR will assess your writing according to the following standards:

 

 

  A (4) B (3) C (2) D/F (1/0)
Focus: Purpose Purpose is clear Shows awareness of purpose Shows limited awareness of purpose No awareness
Main idea Clearly presents a There is a main idea Vague sense of a No main idea
  main idea and supported throughout main idea, weakly  
  supports it most of the paper. supported  
  throughout the   throughout the  
  paper.   paper.  
Organization: Well-planned and Good overall There is a sense of No sense of
Overall well-thought out. organization, includes organization, organization
  Includes title, the main although some of the  
  introduction, organizational tools. organizational tools  
  statement of main   are used weakly or  
  idea, transitions and   Missing  
  conclusion.      
Organization: All paragraphs have Most paragraphs have Some paragraphs Para. lack clear ideas
Paragraphs clear ideas, are clear ideas, are have clear ideas,  
  supported with supported with some support from  
  examples and have examples and have examples may be  
  smooth transitions. transitions. missing and  
      transitions are weak.  
Content Exceptionally well- Well-presented and Content is sound and Content is not sound
  presented and argued; ideas are solid; ideas are  
  argued; ideas are detailed, developed present but not  
  detailed, well- and supported with particularly  
  developed, evidence and details, developed or  
  supported with mostly specific. supported; some  
  specific evidence &   evidence, but  
  facts, as well as   usually of a  
  examples and   generalized nature.  
  specific details.      
Research (if Sources are Sources are well Sources support The paper does not
assignment exceptionally well- integrated and some claims made in use adequate
includes a integrated and they support the paper’s the paper, but might research or if it does,
research support claims claims. There may be not be integrated the sources are not
component) argued in the paper occasional errors, but well within the integrated well.
  very effectively. the sources and paper’s argument. They are not cited
  Quotations and Works Cited conform There may be a few correctly according
  Works Cited to MLA style sheet. errors in MLA to MLA style, nor
  conform to MLA   style.. listed correctly on
  style sheet.     the Works Cited
        page.
Style: Sentence Sentences are clear Sentences are clear Sentences are Sentences aren’t
structure and varied in but may lack generally clear but clear
  pattern, from simple variation; a few may may have awkward  
  to complex, with be awkward and there structure or unclear  
  excellent use of may be a few content; there may  
  punctuation. punctuation errors. be patterns of  
      punctuation errors.  
Style: Word There is clear use of There is an attempt at There is little No attempt at style
choice, Tone a personal and a personal style but attempt at style;  
  unique style of style of writing may reads as flat and  
  writing, suited to be awkward or perhaps  
  audience and unsuited to audience uninteresting in  
  purpose; the paper and purpose; the content, which is  
  holds the reader’s reader may lose usually generalized  
  interest with ease. interest in some and clichéd.  
    sections of the paper.    
Style: Details Large amounts of Some use of specific Little use of specific No use of examples
and Examples specific examples examples and examples and  
  and detailed detailed descriptions. details; mostly  
  descriptions. May have extended generalized  
    examples that go on examples and little  
    for too long. description.  
Grammar & Excellent grammar, A few errors in Shows a pattern of Continuous errors
Mechanics spelling, syntax and grammar, spelling, errors in spelling,  
  punctuation. syntax and grammar, syntax  
    punctuation, but not and/or punctuation.  
    many. Could also be a sign  
      of lack of proof-  
      reading.  

Process Of Investigation And Prosecution

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Facility Layout and Capacity Planning

Facility Layout and Capacity Planning

Back in Unit 2 the CEO asked you to forecast demand for the next 36 months in order to determine if leasing the building next door was a good investment. Now she needs to know how many production staff are needed, based on your forecast, to handle production operations if she pulls the trigger on the lease. Again, you could shoot from the hip and give her your best guess, but knowing that payroll is the largest single expense in your production department you reply, “let me run the numbers and I’ll let you know in a couple of hours.”  This is what the wise operations manager would do.

In this unit, you will get the opportunity conduct capacity planning and scheduling analysis, and then solve problems using your results. In addition to scheduling and capacity analysis, you will learn the importance of facility layout with regards to maximizing production.

Unit Learning Outcomes

1.  Prepare a strategy for capacity planning for an organization. (CLO 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7)

2. Analyze the risks to an organization resulting from a poorly designed process flow. (CLO 2, 6, and 7)

3. Examine considerations for optimizing facility layout of an organization. (CLO 2, 6, and 7)

4. Evaluate the impact of facility layout on process efficiency and suggest changes to improve operational outcomes. (CLO 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7)

Directions

End of Chapter Problems (60 points):  Answer the following end of chapter problems from the textbook: Chapter 5 – problems 2, 6, and 12 (pages 217-219, 10 points each).

View the following example videos before working the problems:

https://canvas.park.edu/courses/62827/files/8248193/download?download_frd=1

https://canvas.park.edu/courses/62827/files/8248194/download?download_frd=1

 

QUESTIONS:

2. In a job shop, effective capacity is only 50 percent of design capacity, and actual output is 80 percent of effective capacity. What design capacity would be needed to achieve an actual output of eight jobs per week?

 

6. A real estate agent is considering changing her land line phone plan. There are three plans to choose from, all of which involve a monthly service charge of $20. Plan A has a cost of $.45 a minute for daytime calls and $.20 a minute for evening calls. Plan B has a charge of $.55 a minute for daytime calls and $.15 a minute for evening calls. Plan C has a flat rate of $80 with 200 minutes of calls allowed per month and a charge of $.40 per minute beyond that, day or evening.

a. Determine the total charge under each plan for this case: 120 minutes of day calls and 40 minutes of evening calls in a month.

b. Prepare a graph that shows total monthly cost for each plan versus daytime call minutes.

c. If the agent will use the service for daytime calls, over what range of call minutes will each plan be optimal?

d. Suppose that the agent expects both daytime and evening calls. At what point (i.e., percentage of call minutes for daytime calls) would she be indifferent between plans A and B?

12. A manager must decide which type of machine to buy, A, B, or C. Machine costs are as follows:

Machine Cost
A $40,000
B $30,000
C $80,000

 

Chapter 6 – problems 1, 2, and 9 (pages 291-294, 10 points each).

View the following example videos before working the problems:

https://canvas.park.edu/courses/62827/files/8248195/download?download_frd=1

https://canvas.park.edu/courses/62827/files/8248196/download?download_frd=1

1. An assembly line with 17 tasks is to be balanced. The longest task is 2.4 minutes, and the total time for all tasks is 18 minutes. The line will operate for 450 minutes per day.

a. What are the minimum and maximum cycle times?

b. What range of output is theoretically possible for the line?

c. What is the minimum number of workstations needed if the maximum output rate is to be sought?

d. What cycle time will provide an output rate of 125 units per day?

e. What output potential will result if the cycle time is (1) 9 minutes? (2) 15 minutes?

 

2. A manager wants to assign tasks to workstations as efficiently as possible and achieve an hourly output of 33⅓ units. Assume the shop works a 60-minute hour. Assign the tasks shown in the accompanying precedence diagram (times are in minutes) to workstations using the following rules:

a. In order of most following tasks. Tiebreaker: greatest positional weight.

b. In order of greatest positional weight. Tiebreaker: most following tasks.

c. What is the efficiency?

 

9. A shop works a 400-minute day. The manager of the shop wants an output of 200 units per day for the assembly line that has the elemental tasks shown in the table. Do the following:

a. Construct the precedence diagram.

b. Assign tasks according to the most following tasks rule. Break ties with the greatest positional weight rule.

c. Assign tasks according to the greatest positional weight rule. Break ties with the most following tasks rule.

d. Compute the balance delay for each rule. Which one yields the better set of assignments in this instance?

Task Immediate Predecessor Task Time
a 0.5
b a 1.4
c a 1.2
d a 0.7
e b, c 0.5
f d 1.0
g e 0.4
h g 0.3
i f 0.5
j e, i 0.8
k h, j 0.9
m k 0.3

Attachment Theory and Psychotherapy

Attachment Theory and Psychotherapy
Helen was born of average size and weight. Helen was an easy baby. She cried when she was hungry or cold or needed some attention but slept through the night by the time she was 4 months old. She adapted to change easily. Her mother worked full time and decided not to nurse. In this way, others could help with care giving. Helen’s father worked long hours, and when he was home, he was too tired to help with Helen’s feeding, diapering, and nighttime needs. Helen’s mother fed her regularly but did not think that when Helen cried after only 2 hours that she could possibly be hungry again, so she ignored some of Helen’s cries. As Helen got older, her father began to spend more time with her—mainly in play. Helen’s mother rarely played with her. During the day when Helen’s mother worked, Helen was taken care of by her aunt. Her aunt spent a lot of time playing with, singing to, and rocking Helen when she needed to be comforted.

Review the article, “Introduction to the Special Section on Attachment Theory and Psychotherapy.”

Write an analysis of both Helen’s temperament and of the sensitivity of her caregivers.
Explain what research suggests about how Helen’s caregivers’ own attachment histories may influence how they interact with her.
Predict Helen’s attachment style. Be sure to explain how Helen’s temperament influences her attachment style.
Provide clear justification for your conclusions regarding the factors that influence the development of attachment style.

 

 

 

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Professionalism And Social Media

Professionalism And Social Media

Social media plays a significant role in the lives of nurses in both their professional and personal lives. Additionally, social media is now considered a mainstream part of the process for recruiting and hiring candidates. Inappropriate or unethical conduct on social media can create legal problems for nurses as well as the field of nursing.

Login to all social media sites in which you engage. Review your profile, pictures and posts. Based on the professional standards of nursing, identify items that would be considered unprofessional and potentially detrimental to your career and that negatively impact the reputation of the nursing field.

In 500-750 words, summarize the findings of your review. Include the following:

Describe the posts or conversations in which you have engaged that might be considered inappropriate based on the professional standards of nursing.
Discuss why nurses have a responsibility to uphold a standard of conduct consistent with the standards governing the profession of nursing at work and in their personal lives. Include discussion of how personal conduct can violate HIPAA or be considered unethical or unprofessional. Provide an example of each to support your answer.
Based on the analysis of your social media, discuss what areas of your social media activity reflect Christian values as they relate to respecting human value and dignity for all individuals. Describe areas of your social media activity that could be improved.
Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. Refer to the LopesWrite Technical Support articles for assistance.

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Assessment 4 Instructions: ANOVA Application and Interpretation

Assessment 4 Instructions: ANOVA Application and Interpretation

Assessment 4 Instructions: ANOVA Application and Interpretation

  • Complete an SPSS data analysis report using ANOVA for assigned variables.

    You’re starting to learn some important information about your data, but you still want to know more. It’s time for a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Unlike t-tests, which only allow for comparisons of two groups, ANOVA will allow you to examine potential group differences for variables with multiple levels.

    Instructions

    Complete this assessment using the Data Analysis and Application Template [DOC] (also known as the DAA Template).

    The grades.sav file is a sample SPSS data set. The data represent a teacher’s recording of student demographics and performance on quizzes and a final exam across three sections of the course. Each section consists of 35 students (N = 105). There are 21 variables in grades.sav.

    This assessment is on ANOVA. You will analyze the following variables in the grades.sav data set:

    SPSS Variables and Definitions
    SPSS Variable Definition
    Section Class section
    Quiz3 Quiz 3: number of correct answers
    Step 1: The Data Analysis Plan

    In Step 1:

    • Name the variables used in this analysis and whether they are categorical or continuous.
    • State a research question, null hypothesis, and alternate hypothesis for the ANOVA.
    Step 2: Testing Assumptions

    Test for one of the assumptions of ANOVA—normality.

    • Create SPSS output showing the Shapiro-Wilk test of normality. Run the Shapiro-Wilk test on the dependent variable test for the entire sample. Do not split the data up by gender before running the normality test.
    • Paste the table in the DAA.
    • Interpret the Shapiro-Wilk test and how you determined whether the assumption of normality was met or violated.
    Step 3: Results and Interpretation

    In Step 3:

    • Paste the following SPSS tables into the document:
      • Descriptives table.
      • ANOVA table.
      • Multiple Comparison table.
    • Report the means and standard deviations of quiz3 for each group of the section variable.
    • Report the results of the F test and interpret the statistical results against the null hypothesis and state whether it is accepted or rejected.
    • Interpret the post-hoc tests (multiple comparisons), if the F is significant.
    Step 4: Statistical Conclusions

    In Step 4:

    • Provide a brief summary of your analysis and the conclusions drawn about this ANOVA.
    • Analyze the limitations of the statistical test and/or possible alternative explanations for your results.
    Step 5: Application

    In Step 5:

    • Analyze how you might use the ANOVA in your field of study.
    • Name an independent variable (IV) (the IV should have three or more groups or categories) and dependent variable (DV) that would work for such an analysis and why studying it may be important to the field or practice.

    Submit your DAA Template as an attached Word document in the assessment area.

    Software

    The following statistical analysis software is required to complete your assessments in this course:

    • IBM SPSS Statistics Standard or Premium GradPack, version 24 or higher, for PC or Mac.

    You have access to the more robust IBM SPSS Statistics Premium GradPack.

    Please refer to the Statistical Software page on Campus for general information on SPSS software, including the most recent version made available to Capella learners.

    Make sure that your SPSS software is downloaded and installed with fully activated licensing on your computer and running properly within your operating system (PC or Mac). If you need help with these steps, refer to the SPSS Installation Helper.

    Competencies Measured

    By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the course competencies through the following assessment scoring guide criteria:

    • Competency 1: Analyze the computation, application, strengths, and limitations of various statistical tests.
      • Analyze statistical assumptions.
    • Competency 2: Analyze the decision-making process of data analysis.
      • Articulate the data analysis plan.
    • Competency 3: Apply knowledge of hypothesis testing.
      • Interpret statistical results and hypotheses.
    • Competency 4: Interpret the results of statistical analyses.
      • Explain statistical conclusions, the limitations of the test, and possible alternative explanations.
    • Competency 6: Apply the results of statistical analyses (your own or others’) to your field of interest or career.
      • Analyze the potential applications of the test in the field and their implications.
    • Competency 7: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members in the identified field of study.
      • Communicate in a manner that is scholarly and professional, and adheres to APA style and formatting.

returns and standard deviations for Coca-Cola and Netflix

returns and standard deviations for Coca-Cola and Netflix

Overview: This activity will help you gather and analyze data relating to returns and standard deviations.

Prompt: Use Yahoo! Finance to get monthly pricing for the S&P 500 ETF (SPY), Coca-Cola, and Netflix for the past five years. Use the provided instructions to complete this activity.

Specifically, the following critical elements must be addressed:

Calculate the monthly returns for S&P 500 ETF (SPY), Coca-Cola, and Netflix, supporting each calculation by showing the work involved.

Calculate the average monthly return for S&P 500 ETF (SPY), Coca-Cola, and Netflix, supporting each calculation by showing the work involved.

Calculate the annualized returns based on the monthly average return for S&P 500 ETF (SPY), Coca-Cola, and Netflix, supporting each calculation by showing the work involved.

Calculate the standard deviation of monthly returns for S&P 500 ETF (SPY), Coca Cola, and Netflix, supporting each calculation by showing the work involved.

Calculate the annualized standard deviation based on standard deviation of monthly returns, supporting each calculation by showing the work involved.

Compare the differences in returns and standard deviations of the three sets of data and discuss their investment implications using a cell within the

spreadsheet document.

Rubric

Guidelines for Submission: You must submit a completed Excel spreadsheet that fulfills the requirements outlined in the Module Two Activity Instructions

document.

 

 

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returns and standard deviations for Coca-Cola and Netflix